You Will Get DirectX 11.2 Only With Windows 8.1

DirectX 11.2 is currently the latest version of DirectX and many of you are wondering how to get it if you’re not running Windows 8.1. The harsh truth is that you can’t; read to find out more
download direct x 11.2 windows
DirectX 11.2 is the latest version of the popular graphics software. Many folks all over the world are acquainted with DirectX because it was one of those annoying programs you had to install sometimes before playing a game. Not many know what it means exactly, but almost everybody has heard about it. And chances are, albeit slim,  that when you will play a certain game, you will be asked to download the latest version of DirectX, which is  11.2.

But you will be extremely disappointed to find out that this is going to be EXCLUSIVE to Windows 8.1 and next-generation consoles. Initially, it was thought that only the Xbox One would’ve get it. This information has been made public at Microsoft’s Build event which ends today, so hurry up to catch a live stream while you still can.

You can read all the details about DirectX 11.2 on Microsoft’s website, if you’re interested in detailed technical specifications. Microsoft’s decision to release DirectX 11.2 exclusively on the Windows 8.1 is obviously a move meant to force users upgrade to Windows 8.1.


Therefore, it might not seem such a good idea anymore to uninstall Windows 8.1 despite of its annoying errors in its current preview state.

Want DirectX 11.2? Get Windows 8.1

Althought it might seem like an incremental update, DirectX 11.2 is actually a big deal, especially for developers and programmers. The tiled resources ability is meant to augment he amount of details on-screen, so it’s a very important tool for developing and even consuming apps and games, as I see it (correct me if I’m wrong). Gareth Halfacree with Bit-Tech does a much better job explaining this than myself:

Designed to allow a game to use both system RAM and graphics RAM to store textures, Leblond claimed that tiled resources will enable DirectX 11.2 games to vastly improve the resolution of textures displayed in-game. By way of proof, Leblond showed off a demonstration that used a claimed 9GB of texture data – the majority of which was held in system RAM, rather than graphics RAM.

It’s a clever trick, and one that could help boost the quality of future PC games – but it’s one that will require those who have yet to take the plunge to upgrade their operating systems. Leblond confirmed that Direct3D 11.2 will be the first version of the API to support tiled resources, and that it will be exclusive to Windows 8.1 on the PC as well as featuring in Microsoft’s next-generation Xbox One console.

You should also know that DirectX 11.2 won’t come to Windows 8 at all, if that wasn’t made clear from the beginning. Windows 8 users currently have DirectX 11.1 at their disposal. Windows 8.1 users (don’t forget that this is still a preview) will be able to get the official stable release of Windows 8.1 in autumn.


Besides tiled resources, DirectX 11.2 also reduces the latency for DirectX applications, allowing for a faster user interface response. Also, here are other features, new or improved, that will come with DirectX 11.2:

  • HLSL shader linking
  • Inbox HLSL compiler
  • GPU overlay support
  • DirectX tiled resources
  • Direct3D low-latency presentation API
  • DXGI Trim API and map default buffer
  • Frame buffer scaling
  • Multithreading with SurfaceImageSource
  • Interactive Microsoft DirectX composition of XAML visual elements
  • Direct2D batching with SurfaceImageSource

All in all, let’s hope that the updates from DirectX 11.2 will allow for much more awesome games and apps. However, it will be interesting to see whether Microsoft’s technique of luring users to ugprade to Windows 8 will function.

If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment or subscribing to the RSS feed to have future articles delivered to your feed reader.
  • Nerd

    >implying that OpenGL couldn’t store textures in both system and vram ten years ago.

    • Supernerd

      Direct3D has had the ability to store textures both in system and video ram for ages as well (called managed pool), but OpenGL and D3D only support storing the ENTIRE resource in system memory and then uploading it to VRAM. Tiled resources allow you to create one large texture composed of many tiles and then have the D3D stack upload EACH TILE from system to video memory as needed.

      • Sik

        OpenGL never had any strict way to specify where textures are stored at all (OpenGL was always rather loose in this sense), it was always up to the driver to decide what to do (which could be pretty much anything).

        OpenGL never explicitly allowed this but it’s allowed implicitly. If a new method of managing resource memory comes along, OpenGL will also implicitly allow it, just because of how the API works. It may or may not be a bless, depending on how you decide to optimize the program (many game programmers dislike that…).

  • Frank

    OpenGL can do it, as evidenced in Id’s Rage using Virtual Texturing.

  • http://linux-blog.org devnet

    I have an idea…let’s shoot ourselves in the foot.

    Let’s plan out to ONLY offer DirectX 11.2 with Windows 8.1. That will mean that since consumers haven’t adopted Windows 8, we can entice game developers to develop for a non existing userbase for DirectX 11.2!

    It’s a foolproof plan!

    1. Release DirectX 11.2 only on Windows 8.1
    2. Steal Underwear
    3. ?
    4. Profit!

    Why is it that normal people can see this to be a huge boneheaded move but Microsoft can’t? I thought people that worked there were smart? Evidently not so much.

    • shinitaru

      repeat of what they did with Vista and DX10

  • op

    directx 11.2 and new cloud invigilation only in windows 8.1 , you must have it!

  • Pingback: How to Increase FPS in Windows 8

  • Pingback: Download AMD, nVidia Drivers for Windows 8.1 [Links]

  • Pingback: DirectX Happy Uninstall 6.2 Receives Windows 8.1 Support